Poisonous flowers | Be careful around these beauties

Aren’t flowers some of the prettiest things that can be found in nature? Unfortunately, beauty comes with a price as is the case with these poisonous flowers. Scroll down to discover which of these common flowers you need to be extra careful with.

Foxglove

As beautiful as it is dangerous, the Digitalis purpurea is a highly toxic flower. The common name of this flower – Foxglove – is believed to be related to a northern legend. According to this legend, bad fairies told the fox to put the blossoms on his toes while he hunted for prey. That way, the fox could muffle his footfalls. Like the fox, the poison in the bell-shaped flowers and their berries might sneak up on you. When ingested, the foxglove can cause vomiting, seizures, tremors and death amongst others.

 

Monkshood

The Aconitum, better known as Monkshood, isn’t as innocent as its name might suggest. This flower is actually highly poisonous. Because it contains large amounts of pseudaconitine, ingesting Aconitum can lead to paralysis of the cardiac muscles or the respiratory system and eventually death. Whereas only touching the plant can already cause your hands to go numb. It’s best to admire this dangerous beauty from a distance.

Poisonous flowers
Foxglove
aconitum
Monkshood

Lily of the Valley

For a poisonous flower, the Lily of the Valley is quite the popular wedding flower. Convallaria, also known as Lily of the Valley, featured in bridal bouquets of several iconic brides, such as Grace Kelly and Kate Middleton. The Duchess of Cambridge’s bouquet was almost made entirely from Lily of the Valley. Nonetheless, Convallaria should not be digested as the entire plant is toxic and can result in vomiting, diarrhoea and slow heart rates.

 

Larkspur

The ever-popular Larkspur is another flower that you need to be careful with because it contains alkaloids. Pay attention when you’ve got Larkspur planted in your garden, especially if you’ve got children. Merely touching the plant can cause irritated skin. Whereas eating it can cause all kinds of nasty symptoms like abdominal pain, paralysis and even death…

Poisonous flowers
Lily of the Valley
Larkspur
Larkspur

Nerium Oleander

Fever, irregular and slow heartbeats, dehydration and death, are just a few symptoms that show how poisonous Oleanders are. Even though these plants look quite charming and smell pleasant, it is very dangerous. For example, merely breathing in the smoke from burning oleander is toxic.

 

Azalea and Rhododendron

Unfortunately, our list of poisonous flowers doesn’t end here. Both Rhododendrons and Azaleas are toxic to humans and pets. They might be colourful flowers that look beautiful in your garden but the entire plant is toxic. If you ingest any part, it could lead to drooling, vomiting, seizures and again… death.

oleander
Oleander
poisonous flowers
Azalea and Rhododendron

Daffodils

Oh, darling Daffodil, if your bulbs wouldn’t be so toxic you might have been the perfect spring flower… if you have a dog who likes digging up stuff, you might want to avoid planting Daffodils in your garden. Luckily, Daffodil bulbs are only dangerous when eaten in large quantities. Then, digestion can result in vomiting, diarrhoea, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias.

 

Wisteria

We end our list with a plant that is only mildly poisonous, the Wisteria. Especially cats, dogs and horses are susceptible to the toxins of this plant. If there’s a Wisteria nearby and your pet starts vomiting or has diarrhoea, it might be wise to head over to the vet.

poisonous flowers
Daffodils
wisteria
Wisteria

Now you know all about poisonous flowers it would also be good to know which flowers and plants are pet-proof. Always use a local florist for your gift bouquets as they have a wealth of flower knowledge and can advise you which flowers are safest.

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